This is a selection of Applets that have been developed in the classroom by Me (Priscilla Allan) and I am more that happy to share them, so feel free to download them and upload them to your own wikispace or whatever.

More are stored here http://2011maths.wikispaces.com/All+Pages but may not be as polished as these ones.
2012 Files are stored here http://2012maths.wikispaces.com/2012+Applet+Files+and+Descriptions
Topic
File
Intended User
Description
Graphs

Year 9 upwards
This applet has a grid and a line with two points on it. It is designed to allow a teacher to teach gradient their normal way, this just makes it easier. There is a skier on the line, and positive and negative gradients can be linked to the skier going up or down hill. The gradient of the line, rise and run, can be shown or hidden on demand. This feature helps students consolidate their learning with the applet, after the initial lesson.


Year 10 upwards
This extends from the Gradient Starter file. The skier is now on hills, allowing the teacher to encourage students to observe positive, negative and zero gradients in relation to curve. I use it with year 10 and 11, but it is also very good for introducing differentiation. This applet requires the user to move the sliders, not the actual point.


Year 9 upwards
This applet shows the line in the form y=mx+c with m and c being changed by sliders. There is a point on the line which can be moved and traced to the spreadsheet view. The key teaching idea is to see the connection between the line, equation and table of points. The line can be hidden and the point moved and traced to see that the line is made up of lots of points. It is important that the user understands to refresh views to get rid of unwanted trace. The refresh view button is on the top left of the graph window.


Year 10 upwards
This applet provides a visual understanding of the completed square form of a quadratic. y=a(x-b)+c where a is the shape, and (b.c) is the vertex. The equation of the graph, and the vertex can be hidden. Sliders are used for a,b and c.


Year 10 upwards
This applet provides a visual understanding of the factorised form of a quadratic. y=a(x-b)(x-c) where a is the shape, and (b,0) and (c,0) are the x intercepts. The equation of the graph, and the vertex can be hidden. Sliders are used for a,b and c.


Year 11 upwards
This applet shows linear, parabola, exponential, sine and cosine graphs. The big idea is that they all work on the same sliders and the connections between the transformations of different types of graphs are made easy to see.


Year 10 upwards
The slider provides 10 different patterns made of graphs. The idea is to reproduce the pattern by entering the required equations into the input box. It can be used as a class exercise using the data projector, where students write down the equations, or if students have a computer they could work on it directly.


Year 11 upwards
This applet shows the basic exponential function with some transformations using sliders. The form a^(x-b)+c is used, and the line y=c is displayed as a feature of the graph.


Year 10 and 11
This applet is an example of the distance - time graph where gradient represents the speed. There are 3 lines, with different gradients. I have included this one in the list because the axis have different units, and once you know what Geogebra can do, finding out how to do it is easy. When I teach with this applet I make the point that the gradient calculation requires looking at the values on the x and y axis, not just counting squares. It therefore follows after the gradient applets very well.


Year 11
A quick 10 Graphs test where students write down the equation of the graphs shown. This is easy to change and create more tests instantly. A slider is used to show one graph at a time.
Right Angle Triangles
Pythag and Trig


Year 10 and 11
This applet has multiple features and requires a little bit of time to play with it to see the possibilities. I used it in the classroom and in the computer lab with students working through a check list (the record.pdf file provided). The big idea is that you select what to hide and what to show, move the "find" word to a chosen side or angle. Then select the formulae SOH CAH TOA or Pythag, hiding the ones not required. Move the labels to the correct position, (in the case of SOH CAH TOA, after labels are in place the formulaes not required are hiden also) and make the correct calculations. Students use their normal calculator for this, but if they do not have one use an online one. Calculations are checked by displaying the side or angle you have calculated. There can be minor rounding errors. For more information see http://2011maths.wikispaces.com/Applet+Right+Angle+Triangles+All and
http://2011maths.wikispaces.com/Year+10+11th+August+Lesson
Calculus

Year 13
The piece of string is animated. The ellipse can be moved, and changed.


Year 13
This is 10 graphs, which are made visible one at a time with the use of a slider. You can also show the answers. If you change the equation of a graph by moving it or editing the equation, the answers will also change. It is designed as a consolidation activity to build speed of recognition of graphs and their equation. I have not taught Calculus since 2007 so it may, or may not be, useful. When I taught Calculus I used GSP, and that was the 2003 version.


Year 13
Differentiating from first principles, showing the limit as h tends towards zero. This applet is just like the pictures in the text and workbooks, except it actually moves. Point P and Q are points on a funtion curve, with a line through them. You can select to show the three gradients, and see the limit in action. If point P and Q are on top of each other the gradient of the line PQ is undefined, but the gradient of the tangent at P, and the tangent at Q are the same. I love being able to show exactly what I mean, not a stationary diagram with this image in my mind.


Year 12 and 13
I include this one, just to let people know what Geogebra can do. As I have not taught Calculus, even at year 12 level, since 2007, I have not made it pretty or comprehensive. It is just me playing with Geogebra for fun. To see what it can do. The applet graphs the area under a graph - showing Integration in action.


Year 13
As per above. It shows Numerical Integration using rectangles and trapeziums. I have not bothered with Simpsons rule as yet. There are applets out there, just google "Geogebra Simpsons rule" and you will find them.
Geometry

Year 9
Visual proof that angles on a straight line add to 180 degrees. Note that you can push "stop" at the bottom left of the screen and manually change the angle with the slider.


Year 9
This applet shows rotation, reflection, translation and enlargement. Just move the slider to see the different transformations. Each transformation is interactive, in that you can chance the angle of rotation, the mirror line position, the translation vector, the scale factor and centre of enlargement. You can also change the object and see the image change with it. I have not used this in the classroom yet. I imagine I would "right click - show axis" at some point and get students to draw on the white board the expected transformation prior to checking their answer with the chosen transformation.




Fun

Year 9
Perhaps this could be used to illustrate how to get the maximum volume open cuboid from a piece of paper.


Year 9 and 10
I am interested in students creating Geo-Art, I have a wiki for storing ideas http://geogebraart.wikispaces.com/ . I have also made applets for speech language therapy, and these are stored here http://sltgeogebra.wikispaces.com/All+Applets . Perhaps after the junior exams students can create speech applets using creativity, problem solving and geometrical transformations.


Anyone
"That's actually quite cool Miss"
Algebra

Year 10 and 11
This applet provides a visual "proof" of x² + (a+b)x + ab = (x+a)(x+b) = x(x+b) + a(x+b) = b(x+a) + x(x+a) using area. The sliders change the values of x, a and b. There is an explaination that can be hidden. Setting b to zero allows the teacher to start with x(x+a) = x² + ax and develop the concept. This will work for teachers who already teach this way, the applet just makes it easier.